Allstate Compact DS60
Allstate Compact DS60
Allstate Compact DS60
Allstate Compact DS60
Allstate Compact DS60
Allstate Compact DS60
Allstate Compact DS60

This Allstate Compact (Puch DS60) 2-Stroke 3 Speed Scooter was found as an uncompleted restoration project that needed many minor fixes to put it back on the road. This scooter’s model number plate was missing but easily determined because Sears only used this style tail light on the Allstate Compact Scooter model 810.94383. Here is a list of all this scooter’s issues and the fixes that were done.

Issue: Bent rear axle bolt needed to be replaced.
Solution: A brand new chinese pocket axle that is 8inch in length and 10mm in diameter was the perfect replacement.

Allstate Compact DS60
Allstate Compact DS60

Issue: Missing muffler except for the first portion of the header that mounts to the cylinder.
Solution: Welded what was left of the Allstate Compact header to a Puch Maxi header and then to a Allstate Mo-Ped header and used an Allstate Mo-Ped muffler which is very similar in size and design to the original Allstate Compact muffler. The diameter of an Allstate Mo-Ped header is smaller than an Allstate Compact header and a Puch Maxi header’s diameter falls between those two sizes.

Allstate Compact DS60

Issue: Shattered stator plate and damaged stator coils.
Solution: Sourcing a 1970s/1980s Puch moped ZA50 motor’s complete stator plate is very cheap and will mount perfectly to the motor with no modification. If you find you also need a replacement flywheel, the ZA50’s flywheel will also work on this scooter, but the metal fan will need to be shaved to fit correctly. The ZA50 stator will have more wires (6 wires) because it has smaller dedicated lighting coils which aren’t shared, so if you headlight blows, it won’t send extra power to your tail light. The original stator (4 wires) has two lighting coils, one shared between the headlight and tail light and another one for the brake light. With the shared coils, when the headlight would blow, then too much power would get sent to the tail light causing it to blow also.

Issue: Sheered flywheel keyway.
Solution: This sheering issue is very common for flywheels that use the roller pin type flywheel key when met with someone who doesn’t know how to correctly mount and tighten a flywheel. Some say if the crank is cleaned up to have no high spots and is perfectly fitted to the flywheel along with a correctly torqued nut then a woodruff key isn’t needed at all. To play it safe, a slot was dremeled in the original location, and a woodruff key (half moon) was fitted.